jackfrostciicle:

lodubimvloyaar:

Children Read To Shelter Cats To Soothe Them

(Photos by Animal Rescue League Of Berks County. You can follow them on Facebook.)

Also good for the kids. They encourage having slow readers read to the family pets. A dog will listen to a kid read a whole book one damn sssyl-la——-ble at a time, and it will never get frustrated, or correct their pronunciation, or start playing Angry Bird because it can’t stand listening to the slowness any more. The dog will look at the kid approvingly, because, human. Human is talking. Human is interacting.

So this is a great win-win.

i am a 26 year old man and this almost made me cry

bastardlybrendan:

sjhetalia:

ifailateverythingonearth:

Citation needed, correlation does not imply causation

Citation needed, correlation does not imply causation, ironic that a “leader” crumbles under pressure when being called bossy

Citation definitely needed

It’s almost as if this campaign pulled these “facts” out of its own asscrack and has no intent to prove its own point. 

Adding some sources to prove those images wrong

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=VVKyesBzDAs

Meanwhile, on the Girl Scouts own website on Education:

  • Female kindergarteners (83%) are somewhat more likely than their male counterparts (79%) to exhibit the following positive social behaviors: ease in joining others in play; ability to make and keep friends; and positively interacting with peers. (ChildTrends.org, Child and Youth Indicators Databank: Kindergartners’ Social Interaction Skills, 2006)

  • In 2005, female fourth- and eighth-graders both scored higher on average in reading than their male counterparts. (National Center for Education Statistics, The Nation’s Report Card: Reading 2005)
  • A slightly higher percentage of females than males completed high school in 2005 (87% compared with 85%, respectively). In 2005, females were also more likely than males to have completed some college (62% compared with 52%, respectively) and to have received at least a bachelor’s degree (32% compared with 26%, respectively). (ChildTrends.org, Child and Youth Indicators Databank: Educational Attainment, 2006)
  • In 2004, 9% of females ages 16 to 24 were high school dropouts, compared with 12% of males. Females comprise one-half of the population and make up 43% of the dropouts in this age group. (ChildTrends.org,Child and Youth Indicators Databank: High School Dropout Rates, 2006)
  • In 2000, sex differences occurred in science course taking but not in mathematics. More females than males completed courses in advanced biology, Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) biology, and chemistry. Males completed physics and AP/IB physics courses at higher rates than females. (National Science Foundation, Science and Engineering Indicators, 2006)

  • In 2000, women earned more than half of the degrees awarded in psychology (78%), biological/agricultural sciences (59%), and social sciences (55%), and almost half (47%) in mathematics. However, women received 21% of bachelors degrees awarded in engineering, 27% in computer sciences, and 43% in physical sciences. (National Science Foundation, Science and Engineering Indicators 2006)

  • For girls ages 8-12, aspirations after high school are largely educational and professional: 93% for college education; 76% for a career; 67% for marriage; and, 63% for children. (The Girl Scout Research Institute,Teens Before Their Time (2000))

On Civic Engagement and Volunteering:

  • For girls ages 11-12, 73% reported improving the world around them as their favorite activity (i.e., activities related to the environment or helping others). (The Girl Scout Research Institute, The Ten Emerging Truths: New Directions for Girls 11-17 (2002))

  • Girls ages 11-17 participate in student government at markedly increasing levels: 5% of girls ages 11-13; 12% of girls ages 13-15; and 20% of girls ages 16-17. (The Girl Scout Research Institute, The Ten Emerging Truths: New Directions for Girls 11-17 (2002))

  • More young women aged 15 to 25 participate in the following activities than young men: raising money for charity (27% for women vs. 22% for men); regular volunteering for non-political groups (21% vs. 16%); active group membership (22% vs. 18%); membership in political groups (17% vs. 15%); and, participating in a run/walk/ride for charity (20% vs. 15%). (Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement, The Civic and Political Health of a Nation, 2006)
  • In the 2004 election, 55% of females ages 18-24 reported registering to vote, compared with 48% of males the same age. Similarly, 45% of females reported actually voting, compared with 39% of males. (ChildTrends.org, Child and Youth Indicators Databank: Youth Voting, 2006)
  • From 1990 to 2000, consistent young volunteers were more likely to be female (14 percent) than male (11 percent). They were also more likely to be from higher SES households. (National Center for Education Statistics, Volunteer Service by Young People from High School through Early Adulthood, 2003)

  • From 1990 to 2000, females (50%) were more likely than males (38%) to volunteer in high school, but no differences were detected between the sexes two years out of high school (38% for males and 39% for females). Male volunteering declined further to 29% by the eighth year after scheduled high school graduation; no change was detected in female volunteering (37%). (National Center for Education Statistics, Volunteer Service by Young People from High School through Early Adulthood, 2003)

  • As of 2003, female college graduates were more likely than their male counterparts to have volunteered in the past year (50% vs. 43%). Among those who had volunteered, women were more likely than men to have served in educational or religious institutions, while men were more likely than women to have done other volunteer work with children or to have participated in poverty or neighborhood improvement projects. (National Center for Education Statistics, Where Are They Now? A Description of 1992–93 Bachelor’s Degree Recipients 10 Years Later, 2006)

  • College students follow the national trend in volunteering, with females (33%) volunteering at a higher rate than males (26.8%). Both male and female college students were more likely to volunteer for an educational or youth services organization than any other type of organization: 33.6% of male college students, and 30.2% of female college students volunteered at an educational or youth services organization. With a little over 22% of both male and female college students, religious organizations remained the second most popular place for volunteering among both genders. (Corporation for National and Community Service, College Students Helping America, 2006)

I left out few points on the education section simply because the only thing it showed is that girls and boys have different interests they excel at. A Norwegian documentary called The Gender Equality Paradox proves that this is not socially enforced but rather because the minds of boys and girls are different it is natural for girls and boys to have separate interests and abilities.

Female teachers have been shown to grade down boys, unless they act like the girls.

~Mod Prussia

image

anunreliablesource:

shoptawbear:

thinksquad:

Target recently announced that they would like for gun-owning shoppers to leave their firearms at home.
Just a few days after the retail giant put out the statement, three armed men robbed an individual in the Target parking lot in Gainesville, GA.
There is speculation that thieves are starting to pinpoint businesses that discourage firearms from being brought into their stores. It would not be too farfetched, considering all the media coverage that corporations like Target are getting after making these statements.
Fortunately, no one was hurt during this robbery, and police were able to target the suspects shortly after the incident.

http://www.ijreview.com/2014/07/153147-report-target-follows-businesses-like-starbucks-chipotle-changing-gun-policy/

Violent people didn’t follow accordingly to a “no gun” zone? How strange.

When you make and advertise gun free zones, you basically tell criminals where they should hang out.

awakenedvibrations:

fueledbymadness:

highskyesandlowbass:

-nugget:

my-kala:

pr0ve:

how could you not reblog this.

Hardcore judging you if you don’t reblog this.

This is my favorite tattoo picture.

always reblog.

reblog every time.

Powerful…

awakenedvibrations:

fueledbymadness:

highskyesandlowbass:

-nugget:

my-kala:

pr0ve:

how could you not reblog this.

Hardcore judging you if you don’t reblog this.

This is my favorite tattoo picture.

always reblog.

reblog every time.

Powerful…

fraudulentfeminist:

Just a few screen shots showcasing some of female-exclusive scholarships and handouts available in Queensland. 

This makes my blood boil right through my skin. 

If you are a female and the amount of males is deterring you away from a particular field of study, then maybe your motivation and ambition for that area of interest isn’t particularly high. You should probably consider other study options. If you are seriously going to let the gender of other students discourage you in such a way, you really aren’t mature enough to be studying in such an environment. Those other students are there because they are passionate and excited to learn something they love, and you want to demonise them for it because of their gender?  

Men aren’t the problem for consistently and overwhelming preferring fields such as engineering and architecture. Why should it be their problem? Why should they be sorry for trying to study and learn about something they love? If anything, females are perpetuating their own problem by not consistently and overwhelming preferring these areas of study (God, I hate the term “male-dominated”). Sitting back and waiting for other females to fill the void is lazy. Complaining about other females not choosing these stereotypically-male career paths is ignorant. You either lead by example, or your opinion means nothing. 

(For those of you are curious: I am a female architecture student)

I fully believe that enrolments, scholarships, job proposals, pay rises etc. should be competency based only, with no regard to the gender of the recipient/applicant. I stand by this 100% because that is what gender equality is. Gender equality isn’t filling up quotas to balance female:male ratios because gender equality is giving credit where credit is due without discriminating against their gender (this can also apply to age or racial discrimination). Denying a exceptionally qualified man a job because the company already has lots of men, and instead settling for a lesser qualified woman because of a thinly veiled excuse like diversity, is discrimination. 

I do think females need to be more encouraged to be proud of their enjoyment of maths and engineering from an earlier age. I don’t want to see young girls being ashamed of playing with robots and other mechanical toys. Yet with gender targeted scholarships like the ones above, it still sends the message that women aren’t good enough to do it on their own. Nothing is more disempowering, and undermining, than babying females with special treatment. It is condescending.  

I want to see women actively seeking these career options because they have a passion for that field of study. Passion is what makes a truly gifted and respectable career woman. You can buy numbers with gender-discriminatory scholarships, but you can’t buy passion. 

- fraudulentfeminist

cindersk:

rolandofeld:

The sass is strong in Disney.

The truly magical moments of Disney.